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History

  Given its present name in October 29th, 1792 by a member of Captain Vancouver's discovery expedition after British Admiral Samuel Hood, Mt. Hood is also known as Wy'East, from the Multnomah Tribe. It is considered an active volcano, though the last eruptive activity occured at some point soon before the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1805.  The highest mountain in Oregon, and the fourth highest in the Cascade range, Mt. Hood was first ascended in 1845, by Sam Barlow and his party.

History of Government Camp

  In May of that year the United States appropriated $75,500 to mount and equip an army regiment to establish posts along the Oregon Trail. It was later decided to divert the effort to the Mexican war. In 1849 Lieutenant William Frost brought an immense wagon train through from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 429 wagons, drawn by 1716 mules arrived at Fort Dalles with 250 tons of freight. A part of this contingent traveled by boat to Vancouver, as planned. While the rest were waiting for available boats, someone up high in command decided to send the remainder up and over the Barlow Road to Oregon City. Mules, in poor condition, were pulling heavily overloaded wagons. Many literally starved on the trek over the Barlow Road. As usual, it was late in the fall, with winter threatening. About 45 wagons had to be abandoned, before the train descended Laurel Hill. For many years the vicinity was known as government camp on Still Creek. Later, capitalizing of the names indicated that the title Government Camp had gained full acceptance. An actual community was not developed until the advent of O.C. Yocum, Francis C. Little, and William G. Steel, all of whom filed for homestead rights. Some travelers used Summit Meadow.
Mount Hood, A Complete History, Jack Grauer

  Yocum platted parts of his claim in blocks and named the North/South streets 1st, 2nd and 3rd. He spelled his name on the East/West streets, Yule, Olive, Church, Union and Montgomery. The plat was called Pompeii. He later called his town Government Camp and tried to establish a Post Office with that name but the government objected to the two-word name. So he changed it to Pompeii and was granted a post office with that name. But the name of Government Camp had stuck. Yocum built a hotel in 1899, and Lige Coalman bought it in 1910. It burned in 1933. George Calverly built a café at the East end of town and his wife operated it. Everrett Sickler and Albert Krieg built the Battle Axe Inn in 1924. It burned on November 7, 1950. Charlie Hill built and ran Hills Place across from the Battle Axe Inn from 1932 until it burned in 1969. The Rafferty’s built and ran a hotel next to the Battle Axe Inn. It changed hands and names, the Tyrolean Lodge and the Mountain View, several times before it burned down in 1954.



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